1980s Ty-Phoo Tea

TyphooIn 1863, William Sumner published, A Popular Treatise on Tea as a by-product of the first trade missions to China from London.

In 1870, William and his son John, founded a pharmacy/grocery business in Birmingham. William’s grandson, John Summer Jr. (born in 1856), took over the running of the business in the 1900s. Following comments from his sister on the calming effects of tea fannings, in 1903, John Jr. decided to create a new tea that he could sell in his shop.

Sumner set his own criteria for the new brand:

  • The name had to be distinctive and unlike others.
  • It had to be a name that would trip off the tongue.
  • It had to be one that would be protected by registration.

The name Typhoo comes from the Chinese word for “doctor”

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1978 PG Tips

In the 1930s Brooke Bond launched PG Tips in the UK tea market under the name of Pre-Gest-Tee. The name implied that the tea could be drunk prior to eating food, as a digestive aid. Grocers and salesmen abbreviated it to PG.

After the Second World War, labeling regulations ruled out describing tea as aiding digestion—a property previously attributed to tea—and by 1950/1 the PG name was officially adopted. The company added “Tips” referring to the fact that only the tips (the top two leaves and bud) of the tea plants are used in the blend.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1977 Goblin Teasmade

teasmade is a machine for making tea automatically. It was once common in the United Kingdom and some of its former colonies. Teasmades generally include an analogue alarm clock and are designed to be used at the bedside, to ensure tea is ready first thing in the morning. Although crude versions existed in Victorian times, they only became practical with the availability of electric versions in the 1930s. They reached their peak in popularity in the 1960s and 1970s but have since declined to the extent that, in the few places they are sold new, they are a retro novelty item.

The name teasmade is an example of a genericized trademark, introduced by Goblin but now commonly used to refer to any automatic teamaking appliance. It is now a registered trademark belonging to Swan.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1980 PG Tips

In 1956 PG Tips began using anthropomorphic chimpanzees in their TV advertisements. These were dressed in human clothes and were known as the ‘Tipps family’. Their voices were often provided by celebrities, such as Peter Sellers and Bob Monkhouse. By 1958 PG Tips had risen from fourth to first place in the British tea market.  The chimpanzees were from Twycross Zoo in Leicestershire.

These advertisements were stopped in the 1970s after complaints by animal rights organisations. However sales dropped and the chimps were bought back 18 months later. The last ‘Tipps family’ advert was broadcast in 2002.  The PG Tips chimps spawned a spin-off in memorabilia, including trading cards and figurines.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1979 PG Tips

In the 1930s Arthur Brooke of Brooke Bond launched PG Tips in the UK tea market under the name of Pre-Gest-Tee. The name implied that the tea could be drunk prior to food being digested. Grocers abbreviated it to PG.

After the Second World War, labelling regulations ruled out describing tea as aiding digestion—a property previously attributed to tea—and by 1950/1 the PG name was officially adopted. The company added “Tips” referring to the fact that only the tips (the top two leaves and bud) of the tea plants are used in the blend.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia