1984 Acorn Electron

The Acorn Electron is a budget version of the BBC Micro educational/home computer made by Acorn Computers Ltd. It has 32 kilobytes of RAM, and its ROM includes BBC BASIC along with its operating system.

The Electron was able to save and load programs onto audio cassette via a supplied converter cable that connected it to any standard tape recorderthat had the correct sockets. It was capable of basic graphics, and could display onto either a television set, a colour (RGB) monitor or a “green screen” monitor.

At its peak, the Electron was the third best selling micro in the United Kingdom, and total lifetime game sales for the Electron exceeded those of the BBC Micro. There are at least 500 known games for the Electron and the true total is probably in the thousands.

The hardware of the BBC Micro was emulated by a single customized ULA chip designed by Acorn. It had feature limitations such as being unable to output more than one channel of sound where the BBC was capable of three-way polyphony (plus one noise channel) and the inability to provideteletext mode.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

Ideal Games 1978

idealAdvert from 1978 with a host of Games from IDEAL Games including Doctor Doctor & Dont Upset Me!

Ideal Toy Company was founded as Ideal Novelty and Toy Company in New York in 1907 by Morris and Rose Michtom after they had invented the Teddy bear in 1903. The company changed its name to Ideal Toy Company in 1938. In 1982, the company was sold to CBS Toy Company, which itself closed down. Certain brands and toys have been continued through other companies, most notably the Magic 8-ball and Rubik’s Cube.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

 

Look in Magazine Star Wars

70’s ad for Look in Magazine featuring Star Wars.

Look-in was a long running children’s magazine centred around ITV’s television programmes in the UK, and subtitled “The Junior TV Times“.  It ran from 9 January 1971 to 12 March 1994. Briefly, in 1985, a BBC-based rival appeared called BEEB, and later in 1989, Fast Forward, which went on to outsell Look-in.

Look-in had interviews, crosswords and competitions, and it had pictures and pin-ups of TV stars and pop idols of the time. Its main feature however was the many comic strips of the favourite children’s television programmes.  These included Star WarsBattlestar Galactica, Follyfoot, The Tomorrow People, The Six Million Dollar Man, Charlie’s Angels, Worzel Gummidge, Knight Rider, The A-Team and Robin of Sherwood.

Go for Broke

1988 commercial for the Go for broke board game from MB games. ‘You have to lose a Million to win!’