1980s Trivial Pursuit

trivial_pursuitTrivial Pursuit is a board game in which progress is determined by a player’s ability to answer general knowledge and popular culture questions. The game was created in December 1979 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, by Canadian Chris Haney, a photo editor for Montreal’s The Gazette and Scott Abbott, a sports editor for The Canadian Press. After finding pieces of their Scrabble game missing, they decided to create their own game.  With the help of John Haney and Ed Werner, they completed development of the game, which was released in 1982.  It was designed by Michael Wurstlin.

In North America, the game’s popularity peaked in 1984, a year in which over 20 million games were sold. The rights to the game were initially licensed to Selchow and Righter in 1982, then to Parker Brothers (now part of Hasbro) in 1988, after initially being turned down by the Virgin Group; in 2008, Hasbro bought out the rights in full, for US$80 million.  As of 2004, nearly 88 million games had been sold in 26 countries and 17 languages. Northern Plastics of Elroy, Wisconsin produced 30,000,000 games between 1983 and 1985. An online version of Trivial Pursuit was launched in September 2003.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1978 Atari 2600

The Atari 2600 is a video game console released in October 1977 by Atari, Inc. It is credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor-based hardware and cartridges containing game code, instead of having non-microprocessor dedicated hardware with all games built in. The first game console to use this format was the Fairchild Channel F; however, the Atari 2600 receives credit for making the plug-in concept popular among the game-playing public.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1980 Trivial Persuit

Trivial Pursuit is a board game in which progress is determined by a player’s ability to answer general knowledge and popular culture questions. The game was created in 1979 in the southern Spanish city of Nerja by Canadian Scott Abbott, a sports editor for The Canadian Press, and Chris Haney, a photo editor for Montreal’s The Gazette. After finding pieces of their Scrabble game missing, they decided to create their own game. With the help of John Haney and Ed Werner, they completed development of the game, which was released in 1982.

In North America, the game’s popularity peaked in 1984, a year in which over 20 million games were sold. The rights to the game were licensed to Parker Brothers (now part of Hasbro) in 1988, after initially being turned down by the Virgin Group; in 2008, Hasbro bought out the rights in full, for US$80 million.  As of 2004, nearly 88 million games had been sold in 26 countries and 17 languages. Northern Plastics of Elroy, Wisconsin produced 30,000,000 games between 1983 and 1985. An online version of Trivial Pursuit was launched in September, 2003.

Dozens of question sets have been released for the game. The question cards are organized into themes; for instance, in the standard Genus question set, questions in green deal with science and nature. Some question sets have been designed for younger players, and others for a specific time period or as promotional tie-ins (such as Star Wars, Saturday Night Live, and The Lord of the Rings movies).

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

Go For Broke by MB Games 1988

go_for_brokesmallGo For Broke by MB Games advert  from 1988

I got this game years ago as a child – when playing board games was a great way of passing an otherwise boring Sunday afternoon when the rain poured down outside. This was kind of a family tradition without Playstations and the like to keep you amused, no DVDs and video rental was quite expensive at that time so this was a way to get us all involved in something fun. Looking back I can’t help but feel that kids of today really miss out on this fun family time together when you fight over who gets which coloured playing piece and try to outsmart your parents. Didn’t it feel great when you beat them.

This game is still around today – although it is quite difficult to find in the shops and you will have more luck with an online search if interested. The likes of Amazon and Farscapegames.co.uk have it for around £10 new or you can pick it up second hand cheaper on eBay  It involves a very strange philosophy – You have to lose to win so if you are always best at coming last then this is definitely the game for you.

 

1988 Game of Knowledge MB

game of knowledgeThe Milton Bradley Company is an American game company established by Milton Bradley in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1860. In 1920, it absorbed the game production of McLoughlin Brothers, formerly the largest game manufacturer in the United States and in 1987 it purchased Selchow and Righter, makers of Parcheesi and Scrabble.

Milton Bradley was taken over by Hasbro, Inc., in 1984. Now wholly owned by Hasbro, it is still retained as one of Hasbro’s brands, similar to the manner in which Parker Brothers is one of Hasbro’s brands. It is a board game and sometimes video game publisher. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, Milton Bradley marketed a series of games (such as HeroQuest) in North America that were developed in the United Kingdom by Games Workshop (GW) that drew heavily from GW’s Warhammer Fantasy universe, albeit without explicit reference to the Warhammer product line. Milton Bradley also developed numerous game consoles such as the Microvision and Vectrex.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia