1982 Aero

aero-sliceThe process of manufacture was patented in 1935 by Rowntree’s.  Registration of the trademark and manufacture to market started soon after.

In 1935, Rowntree’s launched Aero into the UK, followed by the mint variation in the 1970s. Wrapping was brown (green in the mint version) and displayed the “Rowntree’s” script logo and the large word “AERO”, along with the slogan “Hold on tight or I’ll fly away!” below the “AERO” name. The words “Aerated Milk Chocolate” (“Aerated Milk-Mint Chocolate” for the mint version) were seen multiple times in the word “AERO.” In the 1970s, an advertisement was aired in which kids flying a kite thought the kite was an Aero bar. Then, brown and white bubbles would fly out of the imaginary bar to form the Aero wrapper. In 1988, Rowntree Mackintosh (as it then was, having merged with Mackintosh’s in the 1960s) was losing money and was sold to Swiss company Nestlé, who was already famous for its own Nesquik flavoured milkshakes and Milkybar white chocolate bars. Nestle continue to manufacture many former Rowntree bars and products, and until 1993 several chocolate products continued to use the Rowntree/Rowntree Mackintosh brand name. Since then only the sugar confectionery bears the old Rowntree name (Fruit Pastilles, Fruit Gums, and so on).

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1980s Kit Kat Dancing Pandas

KitKatUse of the name “Kit Kat” or “Kit Cat” for a type of food goes back to the 18th Century, when mutton pies known as a Kit-Kat were served at meetings of the political Kit-Cat Club in London.

The origins of what is now known as the “Kit Kat” brand go back to 1911, when Rowntree’s, a confectionery company based in York in the United Kingdom, trademarked the terms “Kit Cat” and “Kit Kat”. Although the terms were not immediately utilised, the first conception of the Kit Kat appeared in the 1920s, when Rowntree launched a brand of boxed chocolates entitled “Kit Cat”. This continued into the 1930s, when Rowntree’s shifted focus and production onto its “Black Magic” and “Dairy Box” brands. With the promotion of alternative products the “Kit Cat” brand decreased and was eventually discontinued.   The original four-finger bar was developed after a worker at Rowntree’s York Factory put a suggestion in a recommendation box for a snack that “a man could take to work in his pack”.[3] The bar launched on 29 August 1935, under the title of “Rowntree’s Chocolate Crisp” (priced at 2d), and was sold in London and throughout Southern England.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia