1993 Commodore Amiga CD32

The Amiga CD32, styled “CD32” (code-named “Spellbound”), was the first 32-bit CD-ROM based video game console released in western Europe,Australia, Canada and Brazil. It was first announced at the Science Museum in London, United Kingdom on 16 July 1993, and was released in September of the same year. The CD32 is based on Commodore’s Advanced Graphics Architecture chipset, and is of similar specification to the Amiga 1200computer. Using 3rd-party devices, it is possible to upgrade the CD32 with keyboard, floppy drive, hard drive and mouse, turning it into an Amiga 1200personal computer. A hardware MPEG decompression module for playing Video CD was also available. The CD32 managed to secure over 38% of the CD-ROM market in the UK. (more…)

1985 Amiga Home Computer

Development of the Amiga began in 1982 with Jay Miner, developer of the Atari 800 chip set, as the principal hardware designer ofAmiga Corporation. It was initially intended to be a next generation video game machine, but was redesigned as a general purpose computer after the North American video game crash of 1983.  A prototype of the full computer was shown to the public for the first time at the Summer Consumer Electronics Show in 1984.   In order to bring the design to market Commodore International bought Amiga Corporation and funded development. The first model was released in 1985 as simply “The Amiga from Commodore”, later to be retroactively dubbed the Amiga 1000. The following year the Amiga product line was expanded with the introduction of two new models: the Amiga 2000 for high-end graphics and business use, and the Amiga 500 for home use. Commodore later released other Amiga models, both for low-end gaming use and high-end productivity use.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

Commodore 64

Commodore 64

This is an advertisement for the Commodore 64 a popular computer in the 80’s. This particular advert has the Elephant sitting on a chair working his own personal unit :).

The Commodore 64 is an 8-bit home computer introduced by Commodore International in January 1982. Volume production started in the spring of 1982, with machines being released on to the market in August at a price of US $595. Preceded by the Commodore VIC-20 and Commodore MAX Machine, the C64 features 64 kilobytes (65,536 bytes) of memory with sound and graphics performance that were superior to IBM-compatible computers of that time. It is commonly known as the C64 or C=64 (after the graphic logo on the case) and occasionally as the CBM 64 (for Commodore Business Machines), or VIC-64. It has also been affectionately nicknamed the “breadbox” and “bullnose” due to the shape and color of the first version of its casing.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

Commodore 64 TV Commercial

The Commodore 64 is an 8-bit home computer released by Commodore International in August, 1982, at a price of US$595. Preceded by the Commodore VIC-20 and Commodore MAX Machine, the C64 features 64 kilobytes (65,536 bytes) of RAM with sound and graphics performance that were superior to IBM-compatible computers of that time.

The Commodore 64 is commonly referred to as the C64 or C=64 and occasionally known as CBM 64 (Commodore Business Machines Model number 64), or VIC-64. It has also been affectionately nicknamed the “breadbox” and “bullnose” due to its shape.

During the Commodore 64’s lifetime sales totaled 30 million units, making it the best-selling single personal computer model of all time. For a substantial period of time (1983/84/85), the Commodore 64 dominated the market with approximately 40% share, even outselling IBM PCs and Apple computers. Sam Tramiel, a former Commodore president said in a 1989 interview “When I was at Commodore we were building 400,000 C64s a month for a couple of years.” Part of its success was due to the fact that it was sold in retail stores instead of electronics stores, and that Commodore produced many of its parts in-house to control supplies and cost.

For more information on the Commodore 64 visit Wikipedia.