1984 Input Magazine

Input was a partwork published by Marshall Cavendish in the United Kingdom during 1984 and 1985, covering the subject of home computer programming.

It was composed of 52 weekly editions which introduced several parallel themes (such as computer graphics, word processing, CAD, games etc) in each edition. These themes then were slowly developed with each new edition into BASIC and assembly language programs. The resulting programs were intended to run on a selection of the most popular home computers in the UK at the time: the Sinclair ZX Spectrum, Commodore 64, BBC Micro, Acorn Electron andDragon 32. A subset of the programs were also suitable for the Sinclair ZX81, Commodore VIC-20 and Tandy TRS-80 Color Computer.

The magazine was well-known among hobbyists using these early computer architectures, since it provided a useful source of interesting programs in a wide range of themes.

As was usually the case in home computer magazines of the era, the programs were listed in the pages of the magazine, and readers had to type them manually into their computers.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

Commodore 64

Commodore 64

This is an advertisement for the Commodore 64 a popular computer in the 80’s. This particular advert has the Elephant sitting on a chair working his own personal unit :).

The Commodore 64 is an 8-bit home computer introduced by Commodore International in January 1982. Volume production started in the spring of 1982, with machines being released on to the market in August at a price of US $595. Preceded by the Commodore VIC-20 and Commodore MAX Machine, the C64 features 64 kilobytes (65,536 bytes) of memory with sound and graphics performance that were superior to IBM-compatible computers of that time. It is commonly known as the C64 or C=64 (after the graphic logo on the case) and occasionally as the CBM 64 (for Commodore Business Machines), or VIC-64. It has also been affectionately nicknamed the “breadbox” and “bullnose” due to the shape and color of the first version of its casing.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

Commodore 64 TV Commercial

The Commodore 64 is an 8-bit home computer released by Commodore International in August, 1982, at a price of US$595. Preceded by the Commodore VIC-20 and Commodore MAX Machine, the C64 features 64 kilobytes (65,536 bytes) of RAM with sound and graphics performance that were superior to IBM-compatible computers of that time.

The Commodore 64 is commonly referred to as the C64 or C=64 and occasionally known as CBM 64 (Commodore Business Machines Model number 64), or VIC-64. It has also been affectionately nicknamed the “breadbox” and “bullnose” due to its shape.

During the Commodore 64’s lifetime sales totaled 30 million units, making it the best-selling single personal computer model of all time. For a substantial period of time (1983/84/85), the Commodore 64 dominated the market with approximately 40% share, even outselling IBM PCs and Apple computers. Sam Tramiel, a former Commodore president said in a 1989 interview “When I was at Commodore we were building 400,000 C64s a month for a couple of years.” Part of its success was due to the fact that it was sold in retail stores instead of electronics stores, and that Commodore produced many of its parts in-house to control supplies and cost.

For more information on the Commodore 64 visit Wikipedia.