1980s Harp Lager Christmas

harpHarp Lager was first produced in 1960 as a bottled beer by the Guinness company (now Diageo), in response to the trend among drinkers in Britain and Ireland towards continental lager. Guinness converted its Dundalk brewery into a modern lager production plant with the guidance of Dr. Herman Muender, a distinguished German brewer. Various names were considered for the brand, including Atlas, Cresta and Dolphin, before Harp was chosen.  The brand was marketed with the Brian Boru harp as its emblem.

The manufacturer states that Harp is made with pure water from the Cooley Mountains, Dundalk.

By 1961 a consortium of brewers, Courage, Barclay & Simonds, Scottish & Newcastle, Bass, Mitchells & Butlers and Guinness, grouped together as Harp Lager Ltd to brew and market the beer.  Courage’s Alton Brewery, where Courage Director’s had been brewed, was rebuilt to produce the lager in Great Britain.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1980s Faberge

faberge logoThe American oil billionaire Armand Hammer collected many Fabergé pieces during his business ventures in communist Russia in the 1920s. In 1937, Armand Hammer’s friend Samuel Rubin, owner of the Spanish Trading Corporation which imported soap and olive oil, closed down his company because of the Spanish Civil War and established a new enterprise to manufacture perfumes and toiletries. He registered it, at Hammer’s suggestion, as Fabergé, Inc. The Faberge family did not learn about this until after World War II ended. Unable to afford protracted and expensive litigation, in 1951 they settled out of court for US$25,000 ($221,122 today) for the Fabergé name to be used in connection with perfume. Soon, Rubin added cosmetics and toiletries under the Faberge banner, usually sold in upscale department stores. Faberge had a high, prestige status, similar to rivals Coty, Guerlain and Elizabeth Arden. However, by 1964, Rubin sold Fabergé Inc. for $26 million toGeorge Barrie and the cosmetics company Rayette. In 1964, Rayette changed its name to Rayette-Fabergé Inc., and, in 1971, the company name was changed back to Fabergé Inc.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1980s Esso Fuels

esso logoIn 1911, Standard Oil was broken up into 34 companies, some of which were named “Standard Oil” and had the rights to that brand in certain states (the other companies had no territorial rights). Standard Oil of New Jersey (“Jersey Standard”) had the rights in that state, plus in Maryland, West Virginia,Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and the District of Columbia. By 1941, it had also acquired the rights in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Arkansas,Tennessee, and Louisiana. In those states, it marketed its products under the brand “Esso”, the phonetic pronunciation of the letters “S” and “O”. It also used the Esso brand in New York and the six New England states, where the Standard Oil Company of New York (Socony – Vacuum, later Socony – Mobil) had the rights, but did not object to the New Jersey company’s use of the trademark (the two companies did not merge until November 1999). However, in the other states, the other Standard Oil companies objected and forced Jersey Standard to use other brand names. In most states the company used the trademark Enco (“Energy Company”), and in a few “Humble”. The other Standard companies likewise were “Standard” or some variant on that in their home states, and another brand name in other states. Esso ranked 31st among United States corporations in the value of World War II production contracts.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1980s Dansk LA Lager feat Ian Botham

$T2eC16hHJF0E9nmFTMCpBROMd)q)Y!~~60_35Quick Lagr fact; Lager (German: storage) is a type of beer that is fermented and conditioned at low temperatures.  Pale lager is the most widely-consumed and commercially available style of beer in the world.Bock, Pilsner and Märzen are all styles of lager. There are also dark lagers, such as Dunkel and Schwarzbier. The term Lager is a cognate of ligrs, Gothic for “place of lying (down)”.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1980s Cadburys Biarritz

cadburyIn 1824, John Cadbury began selling tea, coffee, and drinking chocolate, which he produced himself, at Bull Street in Birmingham, England. He later moved into the production of a variety of cocoa and drinking chocolates, made in a factory in Bridge Street and sold mainly to the wealthy because of the high cost of production. John Cadbury became a partner with his brother Benjamin and the company they formed was called ‘Cadbury Brothers of Birmingham’.

The brothers opened an office in London and in 1854 they received the Royal Warrant as manufacturers of chocolate and cocoa to Queen Victoria. In the 1850s the industry received a much needed boost, with the reduction in the high import taxes on cocoa, allowing chocolate to be more affordable to everybody.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1980s Access Credit Card

Access-card

One of the early slogans was Your flexible friend (which was featured in an episode of Mr. Bean); another slogan which featured in a television advertisement was Does you does, or does you don’t take Access? (sung to the tune of “Is You Is or Is You Ain’t My Baby”), accompanied by an animated Access and his friend Money (a pound sign); yet another slogan was It takes the waiting out of wanting. Access merged with the international credit card brand MasterCard in 1996.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1980s Trebor Soft Mints

Trebor-Spearmint-SoftmintsIn October 2007, Cadbury announced the closure of the Somerdale Factory, Keynsham, formerly part of Fry’s. Between 500 and 700 jobs were affected by this change. Production transferred to other plants in England and Poland.

In 2008 Monkhill Confectionery, the Own Label trading division of Cadbury Trebor Bassett was sold to Tangerine Confectionery for £58 million cash. This sale included factories at Pontefract, Cleckheaton and York and a distribution centre near Chesterfield, and the transfer of around 800 employees.

In mid-2009 Cadbury replaced some of the cocoa butter in their non-UK chocolate products with palm oil. Despite stating this was a response to consumer demand to improve taste and texture, there was no “new improved recipe” claim placed on New Zealand labels. Consumer backlash was significant from environmentalists and chocolate lovers. By August 2009, the company announced that it was reverting to the use of cocoa butter in New Zealand.   In addition, they would source cocoa beans through Fair Trade channels.   In January 2010 prospective buyer Kraft pledged to honour Cadbury’s commitment.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1980s Shredded Wheat feat Ian Botham

shredded-wheat-weightlifting-workout-breakfastShredded wheat is a breakfast cereal made from whole wheat. As of January 2010, it was available in three sizes — bite sized (¾×1 in), miniature (nearly half the size of the bite-sized pieces), and original. Both smaller sizes are available in a frosted variety, which has one side coated with sugar and usually gelatin. Some manufacturers have produced “filled” versions of the bite-size cereal containing a raisin at the centre, or apricot, blueberry or cranberry filling.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

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