Jacobs Fig Rolls – Faker Baker 80’s

Jacobs Fig Rolls – Faker Baker 80’s

How do they get the figs into the Fig Rolls? This iconic advertising catchphrase has long shrouded the fig roll production process in intrigue, yet in reality, crafting these biscuits is rather straightforward.

The pastry shell of fig rolls is concocted from simple ingredients such as wheat flour, glucose syrup, and sugar, devoid of hydrogenated fat or artificial colors. The fig filling within harks back to ancient Egypt, where figs were mashed and enveloped in pastry.

In modern times, fig rolls undergo an industrial baking procedure. Initially, the pastry and fig mixtures are blended separately, then the pastry is extruded into lengthy, unfilled rolls, later to be filled with the fig crème.

Following closure, the rolls are baked in lengthy ovens. Some brands opt to slice the rolls post-baking, while Jacobs fig rolls are pre-cut before entering the oven.

Jacob’s Fig Rolls have a storied history, originating in Dublin under the Quaker firm Jacob’s, founded in Waterford in 1851. The company’s relocation to Bishop Street, Dublin in 1883 saw its peak, employing predominantly female staff. The factory played a pivotal role in the 1916 Easter Rising. Production later shifted to Tallaght in 1984, and eventually, under Valeo Foods ownership, moved beyond Ireland.

In the 1960s, Gordon Lambert spearheaded innovative marketing strategies at Jacob’s Biscuits, including the inception of the Jacob’s radio and television awards. Collaborating with Irish International, led by the dynamic Mack Kile, campaigns like the enigmatic “How do they get the figs into Fig Rolls?” captivated the public, remaining iconic even today. Lambert’s legacy endured until his retirement in 1986 and passing in 2005.

Rolo Cookies – Skippy (1999)

Rolo Cookies – Skippy (1999)

The Rolo product was developed in England by Mackintosh’s,(later Rowntree-Mackintosh), simply a combination of caramel and a chocolate coating. Rolo was launched in the United Kingdom in 1937.

In 1956, the New England Confectionery Company acquired a licence to produce Rolos in the US.In 1969, the licence for US Manufacturing was acquired by The Hershey Company.

In 1988, the Nestlé company acquired Rowntree and its brands, including Rolo. There have now been Rolo biscuits, ice-cream, muffins, birthday cake, desserts, cake bars, doughnuts, mini Rolos, big Rolos (all of which use the same type of caramel), yoghurts, and Easter eggs made. In May 2011, McDonald’s combined chocolate pieces and caramel sauce with their soft-serve McFlurry product to simulate the Rolo flavour profile in a cross-branded product. In December 2018, Walmart began selling Rolo ice cream cones and ice cream sandwiches in their stores.

In the UK Rolos are produced at Nestlé’s Fawdon factory in Newcastle upon Tyne.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

Maynards Wine Gums – Hoots Mon (1993)

Maynards Wine Gums – Hoots Mon (1993)

Hoots mon! There’s juice loose aboot this hoose! And it’s in HD! Directed by David Sproxton, David Alex Riddett and Pete Lewtas at Aardman Animations

The grandfather of engineer Kenneth Maynard Wood (co-founder of kitchen appliance company Kenwood Ltd)[1] Charles Riley Maynard and his brother Tom started manufacturing sweets in 1880. The sweet were made in their kitchen. Next door, Charles’s wife, Sarah Ann, ran a sweet shop selling their products to the Stamford Hill area of Hackney, London.

The Vale Road entrance of Maynards Harringay factory
In 1896 the brothers formed the Maynards sweet company. Ten years later, in 1906, the company set-up a new factory on Vale Road, Harringay. The new factory site, below an embankment of the New River, had clean Hertfordshire spring water to be used in production, whilst proximity of the Lee Navigation and numerous railways meant easy, cheap shipping of coal, sugar, and gelatin.

Around the turn of the century, Charles Gordon, heir to the confectionery firm, suggested to his father that the company should diversify into making “wine gums”. Nevertheless, Charles Riley, a strictly teetotal Methodist, gradually came round to the idea when his son persuaded him that the new sweets would not contain alcohol. Maynards Wine Gums were introduced in 1909.

Maynards Harringay factory
The works grew to become a four-figure[clarification needed] employer for the Harringay area. As Maynards grew, it expanded its manufacturing operations to other locations, such as a toffee factory in the Ouseburn area of Newcastle upon Tyne.

The 140 portfolio of sweet shops set-up as the company expanded were sold in 1985.[2] and the company was acquired by Cadbury in 1988. The brand merged in 1990 with the Tottenham liquorice mill Bassett’s, and Trebor as well as sweet manufacture of the three brands moved to Sheffield in 1991. By 2002 worldwide sales of Maynards Wine Gums were forty million pounds

Cadburys Mirages 1991

Cadburys Mirages 1991

Cadbury, formerly Cadbury’s, is a British multinational confectionery company wholly owned by Mondelez International (originally Kraft Foods) since 2010. It is the second-largest confectionery brand in the world after Wrigley’s.  Cadbury is internationally headquartered in Uxbridge, West London, and operates in more than 50 countries worldwide. It is famous for its Dairy Milk chocolate, the Creme Egg and Roses selection box, and many other confectionery products. One of the best-known British brands, in 2013 The Daily Telegraph named Cadbury among Britain’s most successful exports.

Ovaltine & The Hot Pot 1985

Ovaltine & The Hot Pot 1985

Ovaltine (Ovomaltine) is a brand of milk flavoring product made with malt extract (except in the blue packaging in the United States), sugar (except in Switzerland), and whey. Some flavors also have cocoa. Ovaltine, a registered trademark of Associated British Foods, is made by Wander AG, a subsidiary of Twinings which acquired the brand from Novartis in 2003, except in the United States where Nestlé acquired the rights separately from Novartis later on.