1978 Mighty Mo’s

The Mighty Mo was brought to us by the Ideal Toy Company which was founded as Ideal Novelty and Toy Company in New York in 1907 by Morris and Rose Michtom after they had invented the Teddy bear in 1903. The company changed its name to Ideal Toy Company in 1938. In 1982, the company was sold to CBS Toy Company, which in turn sold Ideal to Viewmaster International in 1987, which renamed itself to View-Master Ideal in the process. View-Master Ideal was later bought by Tyco Toys, Inc. of Mt. Laurel, New Jersey, upon its purchase of View-Master Ideal. The Ideal line remained part of Tyco until Tyco’s merger with Mattel, Inc., in 1997.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1978 Stylophone featuring Rolf Harris

The Stylophone is a miniature analog stylus-operated synthesizer invented in 1967 by Brian Jarvis and going into production in 1968. It consists of a metalkeyboard played by touching it with a stylus — each note being connected to a voltage-controlled oscillator via a different-value resistor – thus closing a circuit. The only other controls were a power switch and a vibrato control on the front panel beside the keyboard, and a tuning control on the rear. Some three million Stylophones were sold, mostly as children’s toys.

The Stylophone was available in three variants: standard, bass and treble, the standard one being by far the most common. There was also a larger version called the 350S with more notes on the keyboard, various voices, a novel ‘wah-wah’ effect that was controlled by moving one’s hand over a photo-sensor, and two styluses.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1981 Speak and Spell

The Speak & Spell line is a series of electronic handheld educational toys created by Texas Instruments that consist of a speech synthesizer, a keyboard, and a receptor slot to receive one of a collection of ROM game  library modules (collectively covered under patent US 3934233). The first Speak & Spell was introduced at the summer Consumer Electronics Show in June 1978,  making it one of the earliest handheld electronic devices with a visual display to use interchangeable game cartridges.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1981 Eddie Kids Stunt Bike Game

Eddie Kidd OBE (born 22 June 1959, Islington, London) is an English stunt performer best known for his motorcycle jumps. On 15 June 2012, it was announced that Eddie Kidd had been made an OBE (Officer of the Order of the British Empire) in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list.

Kidd started his career at the age of fourteen. He is the holder of many world records for jumping over cars and buses. He has worked as a stunt double in many films notably for Timothy Dalton in The Living Daylights, Roger Moore and Michael Caine in Bullseye!, and Pierce Brosnan in GoldenEye. One of his most famous motorcycle stunts was in the 1979 film Hanover Street starring Harrison Ford. Doubling for Ford on a motorbike, he jumped a 120 feet (37 m) railway cutting at 90 miles per hour (140 km/h) in Shepton Mallet, Somerset.

In his role as stunt biker Dave Munday in the 1979 film Riding High, Kidd performed a motorcycle jump across an 80 feet gap in a disused viaduct across the Blackwater River in Essex.

In 1993 Kidd jumped over the Great Wall of China on a motorcycle.

Despite performing over 10,000 jumps in his career, he did not have a UK motorcycle licence until 1995.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia

1978 Atari 2600

The Atari 2600 is a video game console released in October 1977 by Atari, Inc. It is credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor-based hardware and cartridges containing game code, instead of having non-microprocessor dedicated hardware with all games built in. The first game console to use this format was the Fairchild Channel F; however, the Atari 2600 receives credit for making the plug-in concept popular among the game-playing public.

Info gleaned from Wikipedia